Support

Find everything you need to know about being a Patient or a Tender.
Find everything you need to know about being a Patient or a Tender.
Find everything you need to know about being a Patient or a Tender.

Weetend is a platform for patients and tenders of cannabis to trade, buy or sell cannabis.

Is this legal?
Yes!

As a medical cannabis user you can buy and sell via the ACMPR regulation. This is to say that as a grower (aka Tender) you can be designated by a patient to grow their prescription. Health Canada designation forms are found here.

As a recreational cannabis user in Canada you can share and trade cannabis but not sell or buy from individuals. As a recreational user you are allowed to trade or share up to 30 grams of recreational cannabis. Reach out to those on Weetend and connect today!

How do I use Weetend?
Set up an account as grower (aka tender) to find patients or set up an account as a patient to find a tender, or you can trade cannabis from Tender to Tender. Then simply contact each other via the preferred contact method on your profiles.

What is the process for obtaining my medical cannabis prescription?
You need to visit an authorized health care practitioner to obtain a prescription. In several provinces (Ontario and BC) a medical prescription for cannabis will only be issued if all other alternatives are exhausted. If this is the case there are physicians across Canada that will prescribe medical cannabis if they believe it would augment a patients quality of life. Please use the doctor finder to help you find a doctor near you. Some physicians can consult via Skype if you are too remote.

Doctor


Weetend facilitates a Health Canada program that allows patients with a cananbis prescription to grow for themselves or have someone they know grow for them. The program is also known as the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation (ACMPR).

If you decide to look on the world wide web for answers to ACMPR you are going to find a lot of misinformation. This is in part due to its novelty, having kicked off in August 2016.

We've tried our best to remove the clutter and bring clarity to the Regulation. However, when in doubt refer to the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation: Part 2 Production for Own Medical Purposes and Production by a Designated Person, Section 172-203 for a complete overview of what the rules are for both Patient and Tender (aka Designated person).

If you have additional questions, please do not hesitate to contact Health Canada by email at OMC-BCM@hc-sc.gc.ca (wait time 2 months) or call them toll-free at 1-866-337-7705 (wait time less than 5 minutes on average) (June 2, 2018).

Please mail all queries and applications to:Health CanadaRegistration ProcessAddress Locator: 0302BOttawa, ONK1A 0K9
  • Is it legal to have someone grow my cannabis prescription?

    Yes. It is a right guaranteed by a 2016 Federal Court Ruling known as the Allard Decision. Read the full ruling here. However, you must first obtain a Medical Document from your authorized health care practitioner (i.e. cannabis prescription) and subsequently Register with the Minister (i.e. Register to grow your own cannabis or have someone grow for you). See How do I obtain a license to have someone else grow for me (aka Designated Person/Tender)? below to learn more.

  • How do I obtain a license to have someone else grow for me (aka Designated Person/Tender)?

    Have you already spoken to your authorized health care practitioner and obtained a Medical Document for a medical cannabis prescription?

    If yes, then you can move straight towards registering with Health Canada to grow your own cannabis or ask someone to grow for you by completing this form. However, you or your Designated Person (Tender) must:

    • Live in Canada
    • Be 18 years of age or older
    • Attest that you have not been convicted of a narcotic related offense (Ironically)
    • Not be registered more than once at any time (That is to say that you as someone with a cannabis prescription can’t register twice for a licence to grow)

    If you have questions related to the application process and the application form you can learn more here. Processing time, based on internet reports, is estimated to be: 4-6 months [June 2, 2018]

    If no, then you still need to obtain a Medical Document (i.e. cannabis prescription)from a local health care practitioner i.e. speak to your physician or search online for a local practitioner prescribing medical cannabis and then then you can move straight towards registering with Health Canada to grow your own cannabis or have someone grow for you by completing this here form. Once that is sorted come back to Weetend and connect!

  • Can anyone grow for me once I’ve obtained my Medical Document (i.e. cannabis prescription)?

    There is an eligibility criteria as established by Health Canada which consists of 4 basic rules:

    • Live in Canada
    • Be 18 years of age or older
    • Attest that you have not been convicted of a narcotic related offense (Ironically)
    • Not be registered more than once at any time (That is to say that you as someone with a cannabis prescription can’t register twice for a licence to grow)

    For further information refer to the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation: Part 2 Production for Own Medical Purposes and Production by a Designated Person, Section 172-203 for a complete overview of what the rules are for both Patient and Tender (aka Designated Person).

  • Will the Government of Canada refuse to register an applicant or renew or amend a registration?

    The Minister must refuse to register an applicant or renew or amend a registration if:

    1. a) The person is not eligible if they have been convicted of a narcotics offense (Refer to subsection 174(2) or (3) in the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation);
    2. b) The Medical Document (i.e. cannabis prescription) that supports the application does not meet all of the requirements of section 8 of the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation or is no longer valid;
    3. c) The person who provided the applicant with the Medical Document (i.e. cannabis prescription):
      • Is not a health care practitioner
      • Is not entitled to practice their profession in the province in which the applicant consulted with that person, or
      • Is named in a notice issued under section 59 of the Narcotic Control Regulations that has not been retracted under section 60 of those Regulations;
    4. d) the given name, surname or date of birth of the applicant is different from the given name, surname or date of birth that appears on the Medical Document (i.e. cannabis prescription);
    5. e) the health care practitioner who provided the Medical Document (i.e. cannabis prescription) to the applicant notifies the Minister in writing that the use of dried marihuana by the applicant is no longer supported for clinical reasons; or
    6. f) any information, declaration or other item included in the application is false or misleading.

    Refer to the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation: Part 2 Production for Own Medical Purposes and Production by a Designated Person, Section 172-203 for a complete overview of what the rules are  for both Patient and Tender (aka Designated Person).

  • If I already have a Medical Document (i.e. cannabis prescription) can I grow for myself and is this common?

    Yes, you can grow for yourself and one additional Patient. But first you need to Register with Health Canada by completing this form. For further information see the above FAQ “How do I obtain a license to have someone else grow for me (aka Designated Person/Tender)?”

    Growing your own prescription is going mainstream. Between September 2016 and December 2017 almost 13,000 Canadians have registered to grow their own cannabis jumped or ask someone to grow for them.

  • How will I know if my Tender’s medical cannabis is of good quality?

    First check out who they are by checking out their reviews, check their Facebook profile to see if its fake or not, or give them a call on Whatsapp to get to know them. If the Tender only leaves an email address be sure to ask for a way for them to prove that they are trustworthy and reliable Tenders. Alternatively, ask for a sample if available. And remember, you can always reach out to another Tender if you aren’t happy.

    If you are concerned about the quality of cannabis provided by your Tender you can have your medical cannabis tested by a Government marijuana manufacturer. Find out more here.

    There is already ample evidence to be concerned about Government mass manufactured cannabis. Read here.

  • Can I be a Patient and a Tender (aka Designated person)?

    Yes, according to the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation, if you have obtained a Medical Document (i.e. Cannabis prescription) and you are authorized to produce marijuana for yourself (i.e. You have Registered with Health Canada) you can grow for yourself and one other patient. This is to say you can produce for a maximum of 2 registered patients which can include yourself.

  • Will Health Canada allow me to change my Tender/Designated Person?

    Yes, you can change your current Tender/Designated Person by simply re-submitting this form and choosing for “Amendment” as seen below. Individuals who are already registered to produce cannabis under the ACMPR may request changes to their registration information (e.g., change of address). To do so, individuals should select “Amendment” under section 1 of the Registration Form (Application Type) and provide their MCR number along with the requested changes; individuals must also include reasons for the changes.

    Health Canada will inform your Tender (aka Designated Person) by mail of the cancellation. Processing times for amendments are shorter than initial applications but Health Canada guarantees no time frame. Assume therefore 1-3 months (June 2, 2018).

    Detailed instructions on how to register under the ACMPR, including how to amend or renew a registration and the application form can be found here.

    Please mail the completed application to the address below:Health CanadaRegistration ProcessAddress Locator: 0302BOttawa, ON K1A 0K9
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    Health Canada specifically states that:

    Amendment application (1) Subject to subsection (3), the registered person or an individual who is responsible for them must submit to the Minister an amendment application in respect of a change to any of the information set out in the registration. The application must include:
    (a) the registration number;
    (b) in respect of the proposed amendment,
    (i) a description of it and the supporting reasons for it,
    (ii) the information and documents mentioned in section 177 that are relevant to it, and
    (iii) the date on which it is to take effect; and
    (c) in the case of a change in the given name or surname of the registered person, the Designated Person or an individual who is responsible for the registered person, proof of the change (Section 181 (1)).

    Refer to the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation: Part 2 Production for Own Medical Purposes and Production by a Designated Person, Section 172-203 for a complete overview of what the rules are for both Patient and Tender (aka Designated Person).

  • When I renew my medical document (ie. cannabis prescription) do I also need to re-register my Tender/designated grower?

    Individuals are required to renew their registration with Health Canada annually as their medical document is valid for a maximum of 12 months. As such, a new medical document from a health care practitioner will be required. Individuals may however, need to renew their registration more often, depending on the period of use indicated by the health care practitioner on the medical document (e.g., if it is valid for three months, an individual would have to obtain a new medical document in order to renew their registration).

    With that said, in the case of a new medical document, a new registration application must be submitted (e.g. if there is a change to the daily quantity of dried marijuana supported by the health care practitioner). For your reference, detailed instructions on how to renew a registration certificate under the ACMPR including the registration form and application guide are available here.

    Note: Your Tender/designated person may also amend details of their registration. These amendments may relate to any information contained in the registration, including name change, production site, and the individual designated to produce for them (i.e. replacing the individual with a new person).



  • Why would I use Weetend and not just buy from a Government licensed producer?

    Because we all know there needs to be a better option to expensive and monopolized Government issued medical cannabis.

  • How can I know if I can trust my Tender?

    First check out the Tender's reviews located at the bottom of their profile. If there are no reviews check their Facebook profile to see if its fake or not. You can do this by seeing how many friends they have or whether they've made recent posts, etc. Otherwise contact them on Whatsapp and give them a call and build a relationship to see if you can trust them. If the Tender only leaves an email address be sure to ask for a way to verify who they are. It is conceivable that some Tenders want to remain anonymous for various reasons such as security or identity protection. Alternatively, ask for a sample if available. And remember, you can always reach out to another Tender if you aren’t happy.

  • What is a safe and convenient way to pay my Tender?

    There are many manners in which to exchange money.
    Weetend recommends using Paypal or Interac e-transfer.

  • What are best practices for receiving payments?

    There are many manners in which to exchange money.
    Weetend recommends using Paypal or Interac e-transfer.

  • Do I need to sign a contract with my Tender or do they need to register a business?
    It is up to you and your Tender as to whether you want to formally sign a contract on price per gram and delivery times, etc. or keep it to a hand shake. This is to say that the nature of contracts is not mentioned or specified by the ACMPR or Health Canada. Based on information relayed by Health Canada (via telephone) Designated Growers (Tender) growing on behalf of a patient are not operating as a "business" but cultivating on their behalf. This is to say it is not a "commercial" exchanged of sorts. And therefore Tenders are not required to register a business. There is much discussion online as to whether a business must be established or whether taxes need to be filed. However, HC nor the ACMPR make mention of this, most notably, as of June 14, 2017 the only entity in Canada that is legally permitted to "sell" medical cannabis as a commercial good and as a registered business are Licensed Producers. To do so otherwise, with the exception of cultivating on behalf of a patient, still falls under the criminal code (June 2015).

Key Data Sources:

Weetend facilitates a Health Canada program that allows patients with a cananbis prescription to grow for themselves or have someone they know grow for them. The program is also known as the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation (ACMPR).

If you decide to look on the world wide web for answers to ACMPR you are going to find a lot of misinformation. This is in part due to its novelty, having kicked off in August 2016.

We've tried our best to remove the clutter and bring clarity to the Regulation. However, when in doubt refer to the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation: Part 2 Production for Own Medical Purposes and Production by a Designated Person, Section 172-203 for a complete overview of what the rules are for both Patient and Tender (aka Designated person).

If you have additional questions, please do not hesitate to contact Health Canada by email at OMC-BCM@hc-sc.gc.ca (wait time 2 months) or call them toll-free at 1-866-337-7705 (wait time less than 5 minutes on average) (June 2, 2018).

  • How much can I grow?

    Depends on the size of a Patient’s prescription. The bigger the prescription the bigger the crop. The number of plants that may be grown and the amount of dried marijuana that can be stored is set by Health Canada. This limit is based on a formula in the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation.

    The amount is calculated by:
    • the daily amount, as authorized by your health care practitioner
    • the average yield of a plant under certain growing conditions, such as indoor or outdoor growing
    • the number of growth cycles expected in a year.

    Reference the Government cannabis calculator for precise numbers of indoor or outdoor maximums for medical cannabis cultivation can be found here.

  • What is a Tender’s (Designated Persons) eligibility criteria as as established by the Government of Canada?
    • Live in Canada
    • 18 years or older
    • Registered one account at a time
    • No previous narcotics offences within the preceding 10 years

    Refer to the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation: Part 2 Production for Own Medical Purposes and Production by a Designated Person, Section 172-203 for a complete overview of what the rules are for both Patient and Tender (aka Designated Person).

  • What are the reasons Health Canada might refuse you as a Tender/Designated Person?

    Reasons that Health Canada might refuse you as a Tender include:

    1. a) the person is not eligible if they have been convicted of an offense (Refer to subsection 174(2) or (3) in the ">Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation);
    2. b) the Medical Document (i.e. cannabis prescription) document that supports the application does not meet all of the requirements of section 8 or is no longer valid;
    3. c) the person who provided the applicant with the Medical Document (i.e. cannabis prescription) document:
      • Is not a health care practitioner
      • Is not entitled to practise their profession in the province in which the applicant consulted with that person, or
      • Is named in a notice issued under section 59 of the Narcotic Control Regulations that has not been retracted under section 60 of those Regulations;
    4. d) the given name, surname or date of birth of the applicant is different from the given name, surname or date of birth that appears on the Medical Document (i.e. cannabis prescription);
    5. e) the health care practitioner who provided the Medical Document (i.e. cannabis prescription) to the applicant notifies the Minister in writing that the use of dried marihuana by the applicant is no longer supported for clinical reasons; or
    6. f) any information, declaration or other item included in the application is false or misleading. Refer to the ">Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation: Part 2 Production for Own Medical Purposes and Production by a Designated Person, Section 172-203 for a complete overview of what the rules are for both Patient and Tender (aka Designated Person).
  • How common is it to grow medical cannabis for someone with a medical license?

    Growing your own prescription is going mainstream. Between September 2016 and December 2017 almost 12,957 Canadians have registered to grow their own cannabis or asked someone to grow for them (June 2017).

    However, being designated by a Patient to grow their cannabis is still new with just over 872 Tenders growing for Patients (June 2017). It very well could be that many Tenders choose to obtain their own medical cannabis prescription to grow for themselves in addition to one other patient.

  • Are there Government rules for possessing, storing and producing cannabis products?

    Yes, and best to explore here.

  • For how many Patients can I grow for?

    You can grow for a maximum of 2 patients as per the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation. Or as stated by Health Canada:

    This person can be authorized to produce marijuana plants under no more than 2 registrations in total, which means that they could:
    • be authorized to produce cannabis for him or herself and you if they are the person you have designated
    • be authorized to produce cannabis for 2 people, other than him or herself, as their person they have designated

    Refer to the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation: Part 2 Production for Own Medical Purposes and Production by a Designated Person, Section 172-203 for a complete overview of what the rules are for both Patient and Tender (aka Designated Person).

  • Can I grow at a location where other medical cannabis growers are growing?

    Weetend’s interpretation of the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation is that a total of 4 licenses are allowed within one ‘production site’. Our interpretation is based on Section 184 Grounds for refusal which stipulates that an application for a registration to produce for own’s own medical purposes or an application to renew or amend such a registration, the Minister must refuse to register the applicant or to renew or amend the registration if:

    (c) the proposed site for the production of marijuana plants would be a production site under more than four registrations.”

    Refer to the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulation: Part 2 Production for Own Medical Purposes and Production by a Designated Person, Section 172-203 for a complete overview of what the rules are for both Patient and Tender (aka Designated Person).

  • Can I change my Patient as a Tender?

    Yes, your Patient can amend details of the registration certificate to have you grow for them. These amendments may relate to any information contained in the registration, including name change, production site, and the individual designated to produce for them (i.e. replacing the individual with a new person).

    Weetend’s understanding is that a Patient is only required to update his or her registration certificate if, for example, there is a change to the daily quantity of dried marijuana supported by the health care practitioner. Processing times for amendments are shorter than initial applications but Health Canada guarantees no time frame. Assume therefore 1-3 months (June 02, 2018).

  • How can I be sure I can trust my Patient?

    First check out the Patient’s reviews at the bottom of their profile. If there are no reviews check their Facebook profile to see if its fake or not. You can do this by seeing how many friends they have or whether they've made recent posts, etc. Otherwise contact them on Whatsapp and give them a call and build a relationship to see if you can trust them. If the Patient only leaves an email address be sure to ask for a way to verify who they are. It is conceivable that some Patients want to remain anonymous for various reasons such as security or identity protection. And remember, you can always reach out to another Patient if you aren’t happy.

  • What are the best practices for mailing my product?

    There are obviously many manners in which to ship goods.
    Weetend recommends using Canada Post.

  • What are the best practices for receiving payments ?

    There are obviously many manners in which to exchange money.
    Weetend recommends using Paypal or Interac e-transfer

  • Do I need to sign a contract with my patient or register a business?
    It is up to you and your patient as to whether you want to formally sign a contract on price per gram and delivery times, etc. or keep it to a hand shake. This is to say that the nature of contracts is not mentioned or specified by the ACMPR or Health Canada. Based on information relayed by Health Canada (via telephone) Designated Growers (Tender) growing on behalf of a patient are not operating as a "business" but cultivating on their behalf. This is to say it is not a "commercial" exchanged of sorts. And therefore Tenders are not required to register a business. There is much discussion online as to whether a business must be established or whether taxes need to be filed. However, HC nor the ACMPR make mention of this, most notably, as of June 14, 2017 the only entity in Canada that is legally permitted to "sell" medical cannabis as a commercial good and as a registered business are Licensed Producers. To do so otherwise, with the exception of cultivating on behalf of a patient, still falls under the criminal code (June 2015).

Key Data Sources: